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Fines by CARB in 2010




June 16, 2010 - Retail chain sold non-compliant vehicles and equipment.

NEWS RELEASE
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
California Air Resources Board

Release 10-40

Contact:
Karen Caesar
626-575-6728 desk

ARB settles with Pep Boys for $170,000 for emissions violations  Retail chain sold non-compliant vehicles and equipment

SACRAMENTO – The Air Resources Board settled several enforcement  actions with Pep Boys Auto for $170,000 last month for selling  non-compliant vehicles and generators. 

In California, all new on-road and off-road vehicles and engines  sold or offered for sale must be certified to meet strict  emissions standards.  The Philadelphia, PA based Pep Boys offered  for sale and sold several motorized scooters, generators, and one  all-terrain vehicle that did not carry the correct certification. 

“California businesses that don’t abide by the law unfairly  undermine their competitors by creating an unlevel playing  field,” said ARB Enforcement Chief Jim Ryden.  “The Air Resources  Board enforcement team works exceptionally hard to uncover  non-compliant products before they are sold and begin producing  excessive emissions of health-threatening pollutants.”

In California, it is required for vehicles and equipment to  display appropriate emission control labels that certify  compliance with the State’s vehicle/engine emission standards.  In these cases, the manufacturers of the motorized scooters had  applied for the appropriate certification, but Pep Boys made  these products available for sale (and sold several units) prior  to final authorization. 
Unlike the scooters, the generators in question had never  applied for certification, did not meet California’s emissions  standards, and were illegal for sale in the state.

Ozone, or urban smog, a by-product of the excess hydrocarbons  and oxides of nitrogen emitted from non-compliant models, can  affect human health in many ways including: itchy, watery eyes,  scratchy throat, difficulty breathing, shortness of breath,  coughs, heightened asthma rates, cardiopulmonary cases and  premature deaths.

The settlement dollars will be deposited into the California Air  Pollution Control Fund and used to advance projects and research  to improve California’s air quality.

More information on California’s engine emission certification  procedures is available online: 
  • http://www.arb.ca.gov/msprog/offroad/cert/cert.php for  off-road vehicles; and, 
  • http://www.arb.ca.gov/msprog/onroad/cert/cert.php for  on-road vehicles. 
The Air Resources Board is a department of the California  Environmental Protection Agency.  ARB’s mission is to promote and  protect public health, welfare, and ecological resources through  effective reduction of air pollutants while recognizing and  considering effects on the economy.  The ARB oversees all air  pollution control efforts in California to attain and maintain  health based air quality standards.

May 19, 2010 - ARB settles air quality violations with Massachusetts company for $55,500

Release 10-35
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Karen Caesar
626-575-6728 desk
626-818-0145 cell
www.arb.ca.gov

Settlement funds to be split between Peralta Community College  and clean-air fund

SACRAMENTO –  The California Air Resources Board last month  settled with a Norwell, Mass., heavy-duty diesel fleet for  $55,500 for failing to inspect its trucks for compliance with  smoke emissions standards at fleet centers throughout the state.

ARB investigators found that Clean Harbors Environmental  Services, failed to conduct diesel truck smoke tests in 2008 and  2009, as required by state law.  Clean Harbors provides  environmental services and emergency response for the  transportation industry.

“Trucking in California requires fleet owners ensure that their  rigs are clean,” said ARB Enforcement Chief Jim Ryden. “Failure  to meet emissions standards jeopardizes public health and also  creates an unfair playing field for those companies who follow  the law.”

Under the settlement, Clean Harbors must:

  • Ensure that staff responsible for compliance with the  diesel truck emission inspection program attend diesel education  courses and provide certificates of completion within one year;
  • Instruct vehicle operators to comply with the state’s  idling regulations;
  • Complete heavy-duty diesel engine software and control  technology upgrades in compliance with regulations;
  • Supply all smoke inspection records to ARB for the next  four years; and,
  • Properly label engines to ensure compliance with engine  emissions certification regulations.


The California Air Pollution Control Fund, established to  mitigate various sources of pollution through education and the  advancement and use of cleaner technology, will receive $41,625,  and the remaining $13,875 will go to the Peralta Community  College District to fund diesel education classes throughout the  state.

Failure to inspect diesel vehicles can lead to an increase in  harmful airborne particles that Californians breathe. In 1998,  the ARB listed diesel particulate matter as a toxic air  contaminant in order to protect public health. Exposure to diesel  emissions can increase the risk of asthma, bronchitis and other  respiratory diseases.

The Air Resources Board is a department of the California  Environmental Protection Agency.  ARB’s mission is to promote and  protect public health, welfare, and ecological resources through  effective reduction of air pollutants while recognizing and  considering effects on the economy.  The ARB oversees all air  pollution control efforts in California to attain and maintain  health based air quality standards.


March 30, 2010 - West Sacramento company settles with ARB for $32,550 for diesel emissions violations

Diesel exhaust creates 70 percent of the airborne carcinogens in California's air.  (this is a CARB Lie)
Release 10-29
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Dimitri Stanich
916-322-2825
www.arb.ca.gov

SACRAMENTO –  The California Air Resources Board last month came to terms with a West Sacramento, Calif. produce company for $32,550 for failing to submit its TRU facility report.

ARB investigators found that NorCal Produce did not submit the required facility report by the 2006 deadline, as required by the transport refrigeration unit air toxic control measure.

“California is leading the way on air quality,” said ARB Enforcement Chief James Ryden. “By monitoring diesel emissions the state can set an example for the nation.”

Under the penalty, NorCal Produce must:
  • Ensure that staff responsible for compliance with the diesel truck emission inspection program attend diesel education courses and provide certificates of completion within one year;
  • Instruct vehicle operators to comply with the state’s idling regulations;
  • Complete heavy-duty diesel engine software and control technology upgrades in compliance with regulations;
  • Supply all smoke inspection records to ARB for the next four years; and,
  • Properly label engines to ensure compliance with the engine emissions certification program regulations.
The California Air Pollution Control Fund, established to mitigate various sources of pollution through education and the advancement and use of cleaner technology, will receive $24,113, and the remaining $8,137 will go to the Peralta Community College District to fund diesel education classes around the state.

Failure to inspect diesel vehicles can lead to an increase in harmful airborne particles that Californians breathe. In 1998, the ARB listed diesel particulate matter as a toxic air contaminant in order to protect public health. Exposure to diesel emissions can increase the risk of asthma, bronchitis and other respiratory diseases, and contribute to premature death.

The Air Resources Board is a department of the California Environmental Protection Agency.  ARB’s mission is to promote and protect public health, welfare, and ecological resources through effective reduction of air pollutants while recognizing and considering effects on the economy.  The ARB oversees all air pollution control efforts in California to attain and maintain health based air quality standards.

March 17, 2010 - SMART Refrigerated Transport failed to properly inspect their diesel vehicles in 2008.


Air Resources Board

Release 09-24
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT: Mary Fricke
(916) 322-2990
www.arb.ca.gov

Modesto company pays $23,000 for emissions violations

SACRAMENTO – The California Air Resources Board settled with SMART Refrigerated Transport for $23,000 this month for diesel emissions violations at its Modesto, Calif. facility.

An ARB investigation showed SMART Refrigerated Transport failed to properly inspect their diesel vehicles in 2008.

"Diesel exhaust is the most common air toxic pollutant in California and is a serious hazard to public health," said ARB Enforcement Chief James Ryden. “ARB enforcement staff offer training to company employees who need current information on clean-air requirements.”

The law requires owners of California-registered truck fleets to regularly inspect their vehicles to ensure that their engine emissions meet state air quality standards.

SMART Refrigerated Transport is required to:
  • Guarantee employees responsible for conducting the inspections attend a California community college training class on diesel emissions compliance testing and provide certificates of completion within one year;
  • Provide documentation to ARB that the inspections are being carried out for the next four years;
  • Ensure all heavy-duty diesel vehicles have their software updated with the latest low-NOx (oxides of nitrogen emissions) programming;
  • Instruct vehicle operators to comply with the state's idling regulations and other applicable regulations; and,
  • Ensure all diesel truck engines are up to federal emissions standards for the vehicle model year and are properly labeled with an emission control certification label.
SMART Refrigerated Transport paid $23,000 in penalties: $17,250 went to the California Air Pollution Control Fund for projects and research to improve California's air quality. The Peralta Community College District received $5,750 to fund emissions education classes conducted by participating California community colleges.

Diesel exhaust contains a variety of harmful gases and over 40 other known cancer-causing compounds. In 1998, California identified diesel particulate matter as a toxic air contaminant based on its potential to cause cancer, premature death and other health problems.

The Air Resources Board is a department of the California Environmental Protection Agency.  ARB’s mission is to promote and protect public health, welfare, and ecological resources through effective reduction of air pollutants while recognizing and considering effects on the economy.  The ARB oversees all air pollution control efforts in California to attain and maintain health based air quality standards.

March 4, 2010 - Inland Empire – based company failed to inspect its trucks.

Mary Fricke
(916)322-3220
www.arb.ca.gov

$15,000 settles emissions violations
Inland Empire – based company failed to inspect its trucks

Sacramento – The ARB has settled with RDO Equipment Company of Riverside, Calif., $15,000 for failing to properly self-inspect its diesel trucks to assure they meet state smoke emission standards.

The violations occurred during 2008 and 2009, when RDO neglected to test, measure, record and maintain emissions records from its heavy duty fleet.  The ARB considers these practices to be vital tools in helping to reduce excessive smoke emissions from mobile sources.

“Every ounce of pollution counts,” said ARB Enforcement Chief James Ryden.  “Our laws exist for good reasons.  All companies have to follow the rules and perform the required tests for the sake of our collective health.”

As part of the settlement, RDO is required to:
  • Guarantee employees or contractors responsible for conducting the inspections attend a California community college training class on diesel emissions compliance testing and provide certificates of completion within one year;
  • Provide documentation to ARB that the inspections are being carried out through 2012;
  • Ensure all heavy-duty diesel vehicles have their software updated with the latest low-NOx (oxides of nitrogen emissions) programming;
  • Instruct vehicle operators to comply with the state's idling regulations;
  • Ensure all diesel truck engines are up to federal emissions standards for the vehicle model year and are properly labeled with an emissions control certification label.

The company will pay $11,250 to the California Air Pollution Control Fund to support projects and research to improve California’s air quality.  The remaining $3,750 will go to the Peralta Community College District to fund emissions education classes conducted by participating California community colleges.

Diesel exhaust contains a variety of harmful gases and over 40 other known cancer-causing compounds. In 1998, California identified diesel particulate matter as a toxic air contaminant based on its potential to cause cancer, premature death and other health problems.

The Air Resources Board is a department of the California Environmental Protection Agency. ARB's mission is to promote and protect public health, welfare, and ecological resources through effective reduction of air pollutants while recognizing and considering effects on the economy. The ARB oversees all air pollution control efforts in California to attain and maintain health based air quality standards.

February 24, 2010 - Napa Company fined $14,400 for emissions violations

Dimitri Stanich
(916) 322-2990
www.arb.ca.gov

SACRAMENTO – The California Air Resources Board fined Biagi Bros. $14,400 this month for emissions violations during 2008 and 2009.

An investigation by ARB showed Biagi Bros., based in Napa, Calif., failed to properly inspect their diesel-powered vehicles for excess emissions.

“Diesel exhaust is the most common air toxin in California and is detrimental to public health and the environment,” said ARB Enforcement Chief James Ryden. “Routine inspections are an essential component in reducing harmful emissions, and providing clean air for the public.”

The law requires owners of California-registered truck fleets to regularly inspect their vehicles to ensure that their engine emissions meet state air quality regulations.

Biagi Bros. is required to:
  • Guarantee employees responsible for conducting the inspections attend a training class on diesel emissions compliance testing and provide certificates of completion within one year;
  • Provide documentation to ARB that the inspections are being carried out for the next four years;
  • Ensure all heavy-duty diesel vehicles have their software updated with the latest low-NOx (oxides of nitrogen emissions) programming;
  • Instruct vehicle operators to comply with the state's idling regulations; and,
  • Ensure all diesel truck engines are up to federal emissions standards for the vehicle model year and are properly labeled with an emission control certification label.
Biagi Bros. paid $14,400 in penalties: $10,800 went to the California Air Pollution Control Fund for projects and research to improve California's air quality. The Peralta Community College District received $3,600 to fund emissions education classes conducted by participating California community colleges.

February 24, 2010 - Long Beach company fined $31,500 for emissions violations

Karen Caesar
(626) 575-6728
www.arb.ca.gov

SACRAMENTO – The California Air Resources Board fined Bragg Investment Companies $31,500 this month for emissions violations during 2008.

An ARB investigation showed Bragg Investment Companies, based in Long Beach, Calif., failed to properly inspect their diesel-powered vehicles for excess emissions.

“Routine diesel inspections are a top priority in protecting California's air,” said ARB Enforcement Chief James Ryden. “Companies failing to conduct these inspections can lead to an increase of toxic diesel particulate matter in the air.

The law requires owners of California-registered truck fleets to regularly inspect their vehicles to ensure that their engine emissions meet state air quality regulations.

Bragg Investment Companies is required to:
  • Guarantee employees responsible for conducting the inspections attend a training class on diesel emissions compliance testing and provide certificates of completion within one year;
  • Provide documentation to ARB that the inspections are being carried out for the next four years;
  • Ensure all heavy-duty diesel vehicles have their software updated with the latest low-NOx (oxides of nitrogen emissions) programming;
  • Instruct vehicle operators to comply with the state's idling regulations; and,
  • Ensure all diesel truck engines are up to federal emissions standards for the vehicle model year and are properly labeled with an emission control certification label.
Bragg Investment Companies paid $31,500 in penalties: $23,625 went to the California Air Pollution Control Fund for projects and research to improve California's air quality. The Peralta Community College District received $7,875 to fund emissions education classes conducted by participating California community colleges.

February 17, 2010 - Petaluma company fined $20,000 for emissions violations

Dimitri Stanich
916-322-2825
916-716-8047 cell
www.arb.ca.gov

SACRAMENTO –  The California Air Resources Board last month fined a Petaluma, Calif. company $20,000 for failing to inspect its diesel trucks for compliance with the state’s smoke emissions standards.

ARB investigators found that Golden State Lumber, Inc. failed to conduct diesel truck smoke tests in 2009, as required by state law.

“Diesel particulate matter is a hazard to all Californians,” said ARB Enforcement Chief Jim Ryden. “By taking steps to reduce soot emissions, companies that operate in the state help clean the air.”

Under the penalty, Golden State Lumber must:
  • Ensure that staff responsible for compliance with the diesel truck emission inspection program attend diesel education courses and provide certificates of completion within one year;
  • Instruct vehicle operators to comply with the state’s idling regulations;
  • Complete heavy-duty diesel engine software and control technology upgrades in compliance with regulations;
  •  Supply all smoke inspection records to ARB for the next four years; and,
  •  Properly label engines to ensure compliance with the engine emissions certification program regulations.
The California Air Pollution Control Fund, established to mitigate various sources of pollution through education and the advancement and use of cleaner technology, will receive $15,000, and the remaining $5,000 will go to the Peralta Community College District to fund diesel education classes around the state.

Failure to inspect diesel vehicles can lead to an increase in harmful airborne particles that Californians breathe. In 1998, the ARB listed diesel particulate matter as a toxic air contaminant in order to protect public health. Exposure to diesel emissions can increase the risk of asthma, bronchitis and other respiratory diseases, and premature deaths.

The Air Resources Board is a department of the California Environmental Protection Agency.  ARB’s mission is to promote and protect public health, welfare, and ecological resources through effective reduction of air pollutants while recognizing and considering effects on the economy.  The ARB oversees all air pollution control efforts in California to attain and maintain health based air quality standards.

February 11, 2010 - Chemical Transfer Company fined $6,500 for emissions violations

Contact:  Mary Fricke
916-322-2990
916-201-0739 cell
www.arb.ca.gov

SACRAMENTO – The California Air Resources Board fined Chemical Transfer Company last month for $6,500 for diesel emissions violations.

An ARB investigation showed Chemical Transfer Company, based in Stockton, Calif., failed to properly inspect their diesel vehicles during 2008 and 2009.

“All trucking companies must properly inspect and maintain their diesel vehicles to ensure that California’s emissions goals are achieved,” said ARB Enforcement Chief James Ryden. “The emissions from diesel trucks are very detrimental to the public’s health.”

The law requires owners of California-registered truck fleets to regularly inspect their vehicles to ensure that their engine emissions meet state air quality standards.

Chemical Transfer is required to:
  • Guarantee employees responsible for conducting the inspections attend a training class on diesel emissions compliance testing and provide certificates of completion within one year;
  • Provide documentation to ARB that the inspections are being carried out for the next four years;
  • Ensure all heavy-duty diesel vehicles have their software updated with the latest low-NOx (oxides of nitrogen emissions) programming;
  • Instruct vehicle operators to comply with the state's idling regulations; and,
  • Ensure all diesel trucks are up to federal emissions standards for the vehicle model year and are properly labeled with an emission control label.

Chemical Transfer paid $6,500 in penalties: $4,875 went to the California Air Pollution Control Fund for projects and research to improve California's air quality. The Peralta Community College District received $1,625 to fund emissions education classes conducted by participating California community colleges.

Diesel exhaust contains a variety of harmful gases and over 40 other known cancer-causing compounds. In 1998, California identified diesel particulate matter as a toxic air contaminant based on its potential to cause cancer, premature death and other health problems.

The Air Resources Board is a department of the California Environmental Protection Agency.  ARB’s mission is to promote and protect public health, welfare, and ecological resources through effective reduction of air pollutants while recognizing and considering effects on the economy.  The ARB oversees all air pollution control efforts in California to attain and maintain health based air quality standards.

February 10, 2010 - Unilever parent company pays $1.3 million for air quality violations

Dimitri Stanich
916-322-2825
916-716-8047 cell
www.arb.ca.gov

SACRAMENTO – The California Air Resources Board penalized Unilever/Conopco $1.3 million last month for illegal consumer products sales between 2006 and 2008.

Conopco, Unilever’s parent company, sold, supplied and offered for sale in California more than 2.8 million units of deodorant body spray that failed to meet clean air standards for aerosol deodorants.

“Consumer products, because of their pervasive use, contribute a growing portion of VOC emissions throughout California.  Therefore, it’s important that every can and bottle of product be compliant with ARB’s standards,” said ARB Enforcement Chief James Ryden.  “The good news for California is that Unilever, after being made aware of the violation, took the steps necessary to correct the violation, mitigate the impacts, and ultimately reduce the emissions from this product.”

The violations resulted in significant excess emissions from volatile organic compounds. These emissions contribute to ground-level ozone, or smog.  Exposure to ozone can cause lung inflammation, impaired breathing, coughing, chest tightness, shortness of breath and worsening of asthma symptoms.  Over 90 percent of Californians still breathe unhealthy air at some time during the year.

Conopco cooperated in the investigation and will make two equal payments of $650,000 into the California Air Pollution Control Fund for projects and research to improve California's air quality.

The California Clean Air Act adopted in 1988 required ARB to reduce VOC emissions from consumer products as a means to reach health-based state and federal ambient air quality standards. Deodorants, hair spray, cleaning products, spray paint, and insecticides are examples of common consumer products that are made with VOCs.  Since 1988 ARB regulations have curbed these emissions by 44 percent, nearly 200 tons per day, and cut toxic air contaminants by 13 tons per day.

The Air Resources Board is a department of the California Environmental Protection Agency.  ARB’s mission is to promote and protect public health, welfare, and ecological resources through effective reduction of air pollutants while recognizing and considering effects on the economy.  The ARB oversees all air pollution control efforts in California to attain and maintain health based air quality standards.

February 10, 2010 - Rapid Harvest Company fined $16,500 for emissions violations

CONTACT:Mary Fricke                                       
(916)322-2990                                      
www.arb.ca.gov

SACRAMENTO – The California Air Resources Board recently fined Rapid Harvest Company $16,500 for diesel emissions violations.

An ARB investigation showed Rapid Harvest, based in Salinas, Calif., failed to properly inspect their diesel vehicles in 2005.

“There are instances where companies are not aware of ARB’s requirements,” said ARB Enforcement Chief James Ryden.  “And while this doesn’t excuse them from complying, any company found in violation that cooperates to bring its equipment quickly into compliance scores a victory for public health.”

The law requires owners of California-registered truck fleets to regularly inspect their vehicles to ensure that their engine emissions meet state air quality standards.

Rapid Harvest is required to:
  • Guarantee employees responsible for conducting the inspections attend a training class on diesel emissions compliance testing and provide certificates of completion within one year;
  • Provide documentation to ARB that the inspections are being carried out for the next four years;
  • Ensure all heavy-duty diesel vehicles have their software updated with the latest low-NOx (oxides of nitrogen emissions) programming;
  • Instruct vehicle operators to comply with the state's idling regulations; and,
  • Ensure all diesel truck engines are up to federal emissions standards for the vehicle model year and are properly labeled with an emission control certification label.

Rapid Harvest agreed to pay $16,500 in penalties: $12,375 will go to the California Air Pollution Control Fund for projects and research to improve California's air quality. The remaining $4,125 will go to the Peralta Community College District to fund emissions education classes conducted by participating California community colleges.

Diesel exhaust contains a variety of harmful gases and over 40 other known cancer-causing compounds. In 1998, California identified diesel particulate matter as a toxic air contaminant based on its potential to cause cancer, premature death and other health problems.

The Air Resources Board is a department of the California Environmental Protection Agency.  ARB’s mission is to promote and protect public health, welfare, and ecological resources through effective reduction of air pollutants while recognizing and considering effects on the economy.  The ARB oversees all air pollution control efforts in California to attain and maintain health based air quality standards.

January 13, 2010 - Newman company fined $37,000 for emissions violations

CONTACT:    Mary Fricke
(916) 322-2990
www.arb.ca.gov
                               
SACRAMENTO –  The California Air Resources Board last month fined a Newman, Calif. heavy-duty diesel fleet $37,000 for failing to inspect its diesel trucks for compliance with the state’s smoke emissions standards.

ARB investigators found that Mello Milk Transport, Inc., failed to conduct diesel truck smoke tests in 2008 and 2009 at its fleet facility, as required by state law. 

“Reducing diesel particulate emissions is the most important thing we can do to protect the public against the harmful health effects of air pollution,” said ARB Chairman Mary Nichols. “Businesses that do their part by maintaining their vehicles help keep our air healthy.”

Under the penalty, Mello Milk must:
  • Ensure that staff responsible for compliance with the diesel truck emission inspection program attend diesel education courses and provide certificates of completion within one year;
  • Instruct vehicle operators to comply with the state’s idling regulations;
  • Complete heavy-duty diesel engine software and control technology upgrades in compliance with regulations;
  • Supply all smoke inspection records to ARB for the next four years; and,
  • Properly label engines to ensure compliance with the engine emissions certification program regulations.
The California Air Pollution Control Fund, established to mitigate various sources of pollution through education and the advancement and use of cleaner technology, will receive $27,750, and the remaining $9,250 will go to the Peralta Community College District to fund diesel education classes. 

Failure to inspect diesel vehicles can lead to an increase in harmful airborne particles that Californians breathe. In 1998, the ARB listed diesel particulate matter as a toxic air contaminant in order to protect public health. Exposure to unsafe levels of diesel emissions can increase the risk of asthma, bronchitis and other respiratory diseases.

The Air Resources Board is a department of the California Environmental Protection Agency.  ARB’s mission is to promote and protect public health, welfare, and ecological resources through effective reduction of air pollutants while recognizing and considering effects on the economy.  The ARB oversees all air pollution control efforts in California to attain and maintain health based air quality standards.

The energy challenge facing California is real. Every Californian needs to take immediate action to reduce energy consumption. For a list of simple ways you can reduce demand and cut your energy cost, see our web site at http://www.arb.ca.gov

January 13, 2010 - San Bernardino County waste hauler fined $307,200 for emissions violations

CONTACT: Karen Caesar
(626) 575-6728
www.arb.ca.gov

SACRAMENTO – The California Air Resources Board fined Burrtec Waste Industries, Inc. $307,200 in November for emissions violations during 2005 and 2006.

An ARB investigation showed Burrtec Waste Industries, Inc. located in Fontana, Calif., failed to properly inspect their diesel vehicles. The company also failed to comply with the solid waste collection vehicle rule by neglecting to retrofit some of their diesel vehicles with the required emission-reduction devices.

"Trash haulers work hard to move waste out of our communities, and they burn a lot of diesel fuel close to where people live and work,” said ARB Chairman Mary D. Nichols. “That's why California law requires that their engines be maintained and inspected to keep pollution as low as possible."

As part of the settlement, Burrtec Waste Industries is required to:

  • Guarantee employees responsible for conducting the inspections attend a California community college training class on diesel emissions compliance testing and provide certificates of completion within one year;
  • Provide documentation to ARB that the inspections are being carried out for the next four years;
  • Ensure all heavy-duty diesel vehicles have their software updated with the latest low-NOx (oxides of nitrogen emissions) programming;
  • Instruct vehicle operators to comply with the state's idling regulations;
  • Retrofit the appropriate number of solid waste collection vehicles with the best available control technology;
  • Comply with all requirements applicable to solid waste collection vehicles; and,
  • Ensure all diesel truck engines are up to federal emissions standards for the vehicle model year and are properly labeled with an emissions control certification label.

Burrtec Waste Industries, paid $307,200 in penalties: $230,400 went to the California Air Pollution Control Fund for projects and research to improve California's air quality. The Peralta Community College District received $76,800 to fund emissions education classes at California community colleges throughout the state.

Diesel exhaust contains a variety of harmful gases and over 40 other known cancer-causing substances. In 1998, California identified diesel exhaust as a toxic air contaminant based on its potential to cause cancer, premature death and other health problems. New research links vehicle exhaust and lung cancer mortality in trucking industry workers exposed to diesel and other types of vehicle emissions with increasing years of work.

The Air Resources Board is a department of the California Environmental Protection Agency.  ARB’s mission is to promote and protect public health, welfare, and ecological resources through effective reduction of air pollutants while recognizing and considering effects on the economy.  The ARB oversees all air pollution control efforts in California to attain and maintain health based air quality standards.